×

You are using an outdated browser that does not fully support the intranda viewer.
As a result, some pages may not be displayed correctly.

We recommend you use one of the following browsers:

Full text

Title
Proceedings of the Symposium on Global and Environmental Monitoring

848
This indicates that it will be difficult to distinguish
attacked from unattacked trees on an individual
tree basis, unless some way can be found to reduce
the variance of individual measurements.
5. SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS
High spatial- and spectra'-resolution radiometric
data have been acquired in south eastern British
Columbia to investigate the feasibility cf
distinguishing lodgepoie pines which have been
recently attacked by the mountain pine beetle, from
unattacked trees. Our data show small differences
between the attacked and unattacked trees, but
these are smaller than the differences between the
two sites we have studied.
These findings indicate that more work will be
needed to understand the general differences
between the reflectance characteristics of different
sites, and to reduce the variance of measurements
cf individual trees.
Two other sites, Rosen Lake and Elko, are available
in the data set. There are also more trees in the
Galloway and Jaffrey sites to add to the sample. It
is hoped that with this data set it will be possible
to eventually report a definitive answer to the
question posed in the title of this paper.
6. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
The authors are indebted to Art Crane and Raoul
Wairt of the British Columbia Ministry of Forests
for helping select a study site containing plenty of
green attack. Their assistance in conducting the
field work, along with Ed Fong and Paul Pilon of the
British Columbia Ministry of Forests, is also
appreciated.
Thanks also to Wally McColl of the Canada Centre
for Remote Sensing for his support in acquiring the
MEIS data.
Murtha, P. A., 1986. Photo interpretation of spruce
beetle-attacked spruce. Canadian Journal of Remote
Sensing, 11(1 );93—102.
Parker, Hon. D.. 1989. News Release. Ministry of
Forests, British Columbia, Sept. 3, 1989.
Safranvik, L.. Shrimpton, D. M., and Whitney, H. S.,
1974. Management of lodgepoie pine to reduce
losses from the mountain pine beetle. Forestry
Technical Report 1, Canadian Forestry Service,
Victoria, BC, Canada
Table 1: Minimum and maximum limits for each MEIS
band.
Mean
Band
Limits
Wavelenqth
Minimum
Maximum
448
433
463
549
533
565
676
655
695
711
703
719
722
715
728
735
726
744
751
735
767
875
348
902
Table 2: The number of attacked and unattacked
trees, found at Galloway and Jaffrey,
which were used in the analysis.
Location Condition
S
Un attacked
11
66
International Journal of Remote Sensing. 9(9):1451-
1468.
Hobbs, A. J., and Murtha, P. A., 1983. Visual
interpretation of four scales of aerial photography
for early detection of mountain pine beetle
infestation. In: Renewable Natural Resources
Foundation Symposium on the Application of Remote
Sensing to Resource Management, Seattle,
Washington, pp. 433-443.
Kneppeck, I. D., Ahern, F. J., 1989. A comparison
of images from a pushbroom scanner with normal
color aerial photographs for detecting scattered
recent conifer mortality. Photogrammetric
Engineering and Remote Sensing. 55(3):333-337.
Ahern, F. J., 1988. The effects of bark beetle stress Galloway
on the foliar spectral reflectance of lodgepoie pine. Jaffrey
Attacked
65
14