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Title
Proceedings of the Symposium on Global and Environmental Monitoring

596
ACQUISITION ON INFORMATION ON GROWTH
Information on the growth of the forest resource is extensive. However, due to large differences in sample
selection and mathematical modelling, significant inconsistencies exist between the existing growth projection
models.
Major components of this process are empirical volume functions, growth equations and simulators, as well as
time-series sample plot data. A key concern here is the calibration of growth models and their applicability
to the resource inventory data base.
APPLICATIONS OF REMOTE SENSING DATA
Remote sensing data is used extensively in the acquisition of the forest resource theme as described earlier.
The data currently used in that process is mainly airborne.
Opportunities exist in the updating multi resource inventories with the use of spaceborne remote sensing
imagery, such as thematic mapper products of LANDSAT and SPOT data. This process is generally cost
effective and accommodates large volumes of throughput. It is emphasized that quality control is a major
component of this process. Also, integration with GIS can increase productivity in resource inventory sampling
procedures.
CREATION OF NEW APPLICATIONS PRODUCTS
Multi resource inventory data, combined with digital elevation models and projected data bases, then with GIS
and Image Analysis software, can provide a range of new products in land related information. Such products
as color enhanced thematic maps ’draped’ over three-dimensional perspective views of selected watersheds,
simulating the effects of various management practices. An exciting new opportunity is to add to this "live"
video images for the same area on a side "window", to combine the "real world" environment with the
mathematical representation. Different patterns of harvesting practices can then be "painted" on the video
imagery for public presentations. Hence, alternative land use practices can be compared for decision making.
CONCLUSION
The multi resource inventory model described briefly in this paper is technologically feasible. However, the
success of its implementation will depend on the availability of financial resources and on the willingness to
expand "timber" inventories to include non timber resource data.
REFERENCES
Cunia, T. 1974, ed. Proceedings: Monitoring forest environment through successive sampling IUFRO S4.02,
Syracuse, New York.
Hegyi, F. 1989, The role of GIS in Provincial inventories, In Proceedings: GIS 89: A wider perspective.
Vancouver, Canada.
Loetsch, F. and K. E. Haller, 1973, Forest Inventory, Vol. I and II, BLV Verlagsgesellschaft, München.