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Title
Proceedings of the Symposium on Global and Environmental Monitoring

In order to make full use of earth observation
data for environmental problem, meaningful
physical quantity is extracted and data sets
should be constructed. Moreover,catalog of earth
observation data and data as itself should be
transfered through communication network.
Concerning data sets, NASDA is planning to
construct MOS-l/MOS-lb datasets, ERS-l/JERS-1
datasets, ADEOS/TRMM datasets and POP datasets as
shown in Fig.2. Table 2, 3 and 4 show examples of
spaceborne sensor data for ocean, land and
atmosphere monitorings,respectively.Catalog
network should be constructed and NASDA is
evaluating PID (Prototype International Directry)
proposed by CEOS and maintain an node in Asia.
Concerning MOS-l/MOS-lb, datasets will be
experimentally constructed in collaboration with
several domestic investigators and datasets
concerning sea surface temperature (SST) and
polar ice will be demonstrated for ISY
(International Space Year:1992). The first SST
workshop was held by NASDA during March 14-15,
1990 in Tokyo where ESA, RAL(Rutherford Appleton
Laboratory),N0AA attended and mergings VTIR/AVHRR
and ATSR/AVHRR were discussed. Meeting of experts
on worldwide network for global environmental
monitoring from space was held by STA(Science
Technology Agency)/NASDA on April 16,1990 in
Tokyo and various problems of global
environmental data network were discussed. These
were also discussed in 8th meeting of CEOS
working group on data hosted by NASDA during
April 17-19,1990 in Tokyo. Moreover, the third
SAFISY(Space Agency Forum on the International
Space Year) was held in Kyoto during May 17-
18,1990 and hosted by the Space Activities
Commission of Japan (SAC),STA,NASDA and ISAS
(Institute of Space and Astronautical Science) in
Japan where main theme is earth environmental
problem.
Table 3 Examples of Spaceborne Sensor Data for Land Monitoring
Item
Specifications
Name of Satel1ite/
MOS-l/lb
ERS-1
ADE0S
Landsat6
SPOT 1-3
E0S-A
ERS-1
JERS-1
Sensor
MESSR
0PS
AVNIR
ETM
HRV
IT IR
SAR
SAR
Wavelengths(pm)
0.40-0.50
0.45-0.52
Frequencies(GHz)
0.51-0.59
0.52-0.60
0.52-0.62
0.52-0.60
0.50-0.59
0.52-0.60
1.275GHz
0.61-0.69
0.63-0.69
0.62-0.72
0.63-0.69
0.61-0.68
0.63-0.69
5.3GHz
HH
0.72-0.80
0.76-0.86
0.82-0.92
0.76-0.90
0.79-0.89
0.76-0.86
VV
0.80-1.10
0.76-0.86
0.52-0.72*
0.50-0.90*
0.51-0.73*
1.60-1.71
1.60-1.71
1.55-1.75
2.02-2.12
2.01-2.12
2.08-2.35
2.12-2.19
2.13-2.25
2.19-2.26
2.27-2.40
2.29-2.36
2.36-2.43
8.125-8.475
8.475-8.825
8.925-9.275
10.4-12.5
10.25-10.95
10.95-11.65
Nominal Spatial
50
18
16
30
20
15CVNIR)
30***
18***
Resolution (m)
8*
15*
10*
30(SWIR)
120**
90**
Swath Width(km)
100
75
80
185
65
60
100
75
Stereo Capabi 1 ity
None
None
None
None
* Panchromatic **Thermal band ***31ooks
Table 4 Examples of Spaceborne Sensor Data for Atmospheric Monitoring(l)
Items
Specifications
Name of Satel1ite/
M0S-1
Nimbus 7
DMSP
ERS-1
POP
TRMM
TRMM
Sensor
MSR
SMMR
SSM/I
M.S.
AMSR
PR
M.R.
Frequencies(GHz)
6.6
6.6
10.7
10.65
14
18
19.35
18.7
19
23.8
21
22.235
23.8
21.0
31.4
37
37
36.5
36.5
37
85.5
90
90
Nominal Spatial
30(23.8)
148(6.6)
20
59(6.6)
4
10
Resolution(km)
20(31.4)
27(37)
11(90)
Swath Width(km)
317
659
1400
1660
220
600
537